What is Micro Managing?

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What is Micro Managing?

What is Micro Management?

Signs that you may be a Micromanager or Work for one: Micromanagers are known for refusing to delegate, focusing on the details rather than the bigger picture. They also tend to take back work that has been delegated if it isn’t finished. They hide the context and keep their subordinates guessing. They are inconsistent in their control and leave followers to wonder if they should act before being given orders. Are you a micromanager? These are the top things managers should do and say to be a micromanager. Avoid delegating work. Don’t get too involved in their employees’ work. Encourage independent decision-making. Expect frequent updates. Look at all details rather than the larger picture. Do not like to be cc’d on every email. Have a high turnover of employees. Set unrealistic deadlines.

Encourage: “shared responsibility” to get the job done by strong partnerships. Encourage everyone to play to their strengths, and those of others. They want to do meaningful work and be great teammates. You can free them. Micromanagement can also be a problem in organisations because sometimes executives are micromanagers. They bring their egos to every meeting and make every decision personal. They place their egos above the mission, customers, or profits. They have made it clear that they believe it and are open to all opinions. Leaders in business who are committed to creating a positive environment for employees, where they feel valued and supported, and where their accomplishments are recognized by their peers, create an environment that is almost impossible for micromanagers.

What should you do? The key to maximising performance potential is to assign the right person for the right job and the right team. The most famous tips for delegating work are: Know your strengths, Know your weaknesses, and Know the strengths and weaknesses of your team. Magic happens when people are assigned the right work and have the right partners. Micromanagers are only a hindrance. As a manager, you have responsibilities. Instead of micromanaging your employees’ workflows because you believe you are the only one who can accomplish a particular operation successfully, let them show their skills and allow you to focus on the tasks that only you as a manager can accomplish. It is your job to establish clear goals and benchmarks, and to measure performance. As a manager, you have responsibilities. Instead of micromanaging your employees’ workflows because you believe you are the only one who can accomplish a particular operation successfully, let them show their skills and allow you to focus on the tasks that only you as a manager can do. It is your job to establish clear goals and benchmarks, and measure performance.

Prioritise Development: Organisations can only improve when they have better people. A plan for employee development is essential to ensure continuous improvement. Development is essential for agility and innovation. If you want to keep your employees engaged and provide a bright future, they need development. Employees want to take on new responsibilities and be challenged. Opportunities and delegating the right work are key to professional development. Not micromanagement. Micromanagers struggle to define clear priorities. They see everything as urgent and crucial. They are driven to get the job done today and neglect their team’s workload. It is difficult for teams to prioritize and classify operations or activities.

Micromanaging and its Effects: Everyone who has ever been micromanaged knows that it is not fun. However, it can have a significant impact on different people. Employees will often do whatever it takes to win back trust. Although this may seem to be a good idea at the time, it can lead to long-term problems. Employees who feel like they are being denied trust often burn out. Micromanagement is an indication to employees that a manager doesn’t trust their work or judgment. It can be a significant factor in employee disengagement.

Makes Employees Dependent: When employees discover that their work is always edited and modified by their micromanager, they are dependent on them. Your staff will lose confidence if you make it seem impossible to do things without your help. Great Place to Work research shows that millennials want leaders who are “in the best interest of their employees, especially in their long-term development,” and not leaders who hinder employee growth by creating dependent relationships.

Employee Turnover Increases: A similar survey found that 79% of respondents had experienced micromanagement and 69% were considering changing their jobs as a result. It’s clear that people don’t enjoy being micromanaged. If you find yourself hovering over someone’s desk asking for an update on a small project or another, think about whether it is worth hurting your relationship.

Compared to Mismanagement: Micromanagement is different from the simple tendency of a manager not to assign duties to subordinates. A manager who can do a job better than the worker is, it’s called suboptimal management. However, this can lead to lost opportunities for the company. Micromanagement is when a manager tells a subordinate what they should do, but also dictates how the job is done. This is regardless of whether it is the most efficient or effective way or if this instruction is required.

Last Thoughts

These are the key elements of micromanagement. Contact us to learn more or view our short courses.

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