Techniques for Interviewing Jobseekers

 In Interviews

Techniques for Interviewing Jobseekers

coursedetailsInterviews are not easy. They can take many forms and may fulfill different goals. If you think about an interview, you probably picture a candidate meeting with you in person. This is the most common type of interview. However, there are many other types such as group interviews, informational interviews, telephone interviews and many others. To maximise your chances of success, you need to know and prepare for the type of interview that you are going to be participating in.

Techniques to Interview Jobseekers

Common interview techniques

Interviews are not easy. They can take many forms and may fulfill different goals. If you think about an interview, you probably picture a candidate meeting with you in person. This is the most common type of interview. However, there are many other types such as group interviews, informational interviews and phone interviews. To maximise your chances of success, you need to know and prepare for each type of interview. Here are some examples of common interview techniques.

Phone interview technique

Employers will likely contact you via phone interview after they have received your email application. An employer calls you to discuss the job and to get a sense of if you are a good match for the job. You may have several phone interviews before you are invited to an in-person interview.

Video interview technique

Employers are increasingly turning to video interviews to screen candidates quickly, due to the efficiency of video software. A video interview is where a candidate calls an employer to discuss the job. Employers can observe a candidate’s mannerisms and preparedness better than during a telephone interview. Employers increasingly rely on pre-recorded videos interviews where candidates record themselves answering interview questions. Employers have the option to view the video at any moment.

In-person interview technique

Interviews in person involve a meeting between the candidate and an employer, usually in the workplace. To determine if the candidate is a good match for the job, the employer will interview them. Employers can better assess two aspects of a candidate through in-person interviews. Employers can assess if you are a good fit for the workplace culture and climate by meeting with you in person. Employers will also be able to gauge if you are interested in the job by meeting with you face-to-face. They will also be monitoring your enthusiasm for the role. Employers want someone who is passionate about the job and not just interested in a paycheck.

Group interview technique

When multiple candidates are interviewed together, group interviews are conducted by employers. Employers find group interviews extremely efficient because they can drastically reduce the time spent interviewing. Group interviews are also conducted by companies to evaluate the ability of candidates to work together. Candidates may find group interviews challenging because they can be stressful. However, employers will be impressed if you perform well in them.

Panel interview technique

Panel interviews are a new twist on traditional interviews. Panel interviews involve multiple interviewers speaking to a candidate at the same time. Panel interviews are held by employers for many reasons. Panel interviews are stressful and show employers how you can handle pressure. Employers can also see how you handle different personalities and how you manage group situations in panel interviews.

Post-interview techniques

It is a good idea to thank the interview team after you have finished a job interview. If you haven’t received feedback after a week, it’s a smart idea send a follow up email. Here are two follow-up and thank you email templates you can use to help you in your job search.

STAR interview technique

The acronym STAR stands for Situation Task Action,  and Result. Each word connotes an experience interviewee can refer back to when faced with quantitative or qualitative interview questions.

Situation: A situation is an event, project or challenge that has been faced

Task: Describe the task that you were asked to complete

Action: The steps or procedure taken in order to correct or relieve the situation

Result: You are close to the results of your efforts

Tips for improving your interview performance

1. Practice good nonverbal communication

It’s all about showing confidence by standing straight and making eye contact with the interviewer. Also, establishing a solid handshake. Your interview can start or end with a first impression.

2. Dress appropriately for the job/company

You are not allowed to dress in casual dress codes. It is important to know what you should wear to interviews and to look professional. It depends on your company culture and what position you are applying for. Before you interview, make sure to call the company to learn about their dress code.

3. Why do you want this job?

Employers want to know why this job is appealing to you. Employers want to know why you are interested in the job.

4. Do your research

Companies want to see that you are interested not only in the job but also the company. Before you interview, learn about the history, values and structure of your company.

5. Review common interview questions

Interviewers will often choose to ask both role-specific questions and general questions. You can practice your responses and improve upon them by reviewing generic interview questions.

6. Prepare physically

When interviewing, body language and speech are equally important. Practice sitting straight up and speaking clearly. Your voice cracking mid-interview will make you look weak and unprofessional.

7. Ask questions about your preparedness

Employers expect candidates to ask questions. Employers appreciate this because it shows that candidates are interested in the job and prepared to answer questions.

8. Mock interviews are a good way to practice.

Interviews are no different. Practice makes perfect. Practice the back-and-forth that takes place during an interview with your family and friends to make you feel more at ease and tailor your responses.

Last Thoughts

Privacy is important. Interviews should be private and free of distractions. Interviews should be relaxed for both the interviewer and the interviewee. This is achieved by limiting noises and distractions. Interviewers and interviewees can take notes to help them be objective and remember what happened, rather than how it felt.

Be involved but not emotionally. This will allow you to think objectively, and build positive relationships. Non-verbal support can be a great way for someone to talk without being interrupted. You can also use non-verbal affirmation such as nodding. Avoid humor and sarcasm, as people can often modify and perceive them differently.

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